LASIK Results at LA Sight

by David A. Wallace MD and Sima Tabanfar OD
Updated October, 2017

The most important thing anyone interested in LASIK wants to know is, “What results can I expect from treatment?”. LA Sight publishes a statistical review of our visual outcomes on a roughly annual basis.  We invite other surgeons and laser centers to analyze and publish their results. In that way, we can learn from, and help each other. Ultimately, this kind of candid disclosure and public accountability serves the interests of our profession and all patients seeking our care.

When I talk with any prospective client seeking vision correction, I try to qualify my own use of statistics as follows:

  1. I am inherently skeptical about anyone who uses statistics in speaking to me. They are usually trying to sell me something.
  2. Statistics are designed to analyze trends in a population or a group. They should not be used to predict future results in individual cases. For example, if the incidence of serious complications in LASIK is 1 in a million, that is extremely low for the overall population. But if you are that 1 case, then for you the complication rate is 100%.
  3. Regrettably, some people use statistics to distort or misrepresent the truth, typically to their advantage. Do not base any decision, especially a surgical one, on statistics alone. Be sure to obtain additional qualifying or “vetting” information.  See our Finding a Good LASIK Surgeon page, for instance, discussing other qualifications to seek and facts to investigate. 
  4. Laser correction for nearsightedness (myopia) is significantly different from correction for farsightedness (hyperopia).  The shape and pattern of laser sculpting is different, and the long-term stability is different.  We describe this on a page discussing Farsightedness Treatment Concerns.  Therefore, it makes more sense to us to present outcomes data for near- and farsightedness separately.  That's why there are two separate tables below.

Results Treating Nearsightedness

(with or without astigmatism)

Data analysis period:  08/16 through 08/17

 

 Eyes

 %

Cumulative
Eyes
Cumulative
%
Total # Treated

 953

100%

 

 

Follow-Up Data Available

917

 96.2%

 

 

20/15 or better

  88

 9.6%

89

9.7%

20/20 or better

768

83.8

857

93.5%

20/25 or better

53

5.8

910

99.2%

20/30

 6

0.6

916

99.9%

20/40

1

0.1%

917

100%

Results Treating Farsightedness

(with or without astigmatism)

Data analysis period: 03/14 through 08/17 - Note much longer period and many fewer eyes

 

 Eyes

 %

Cumulative
Eyes
Cumulative
%
Total # Treated

 57

  57
Follow-Up Data Available

54

 

54 100%
20/15 or better

 0

 0.0

0 0.0%
20/20 or better

39

 72.2

39 72.2%
20/25 or better

10

18.5

49 89.1%
20/30

 2

 4.6

51 94.4%
20/40

3

 5.5

54 100%

The information below may clarify or additionally explain the results in the table above.

  • The current retrospective review analyzed all nearsighted eyes treated in the period August 2016 through August 2017.  A total of 917 eyes were included in the data analysis.  Some eyes were excluded from analysis for one of four reasons:
    1. If the targeted goal of treatment was for clarity at near range ("monovision"), then uncorrected distance acuity would not be an appropriate measurement or indicator of outcome.  there were six (6) eyes in this category in this review;
    2. Some eyes (20 in this series) did not have 20/20 correctable visual acuity before treatment, so did not have the potential to recover 20/20 (or better) acuity after treatment;
    3. Some patients did not return for follow-up visits at 1 month or 3 months after surgery (5 eyes), when visual acuity and prescription measurements are stable; and
    4. Some eyes (5 total) had temporary challenges obtaining optimal vision due to ocular surface dryness.  We fully expect these eyes to recover 20/20 vision but excluded them from review in this analysis. 
  • This review included patients treated with all ranges of myopia (up to about -10.00 D in this series) and all ranges of astigmatism (up to about -6.00 D in this series).
  • The percentage of people with farsightedness is much smaller than that with nearsightedness.  To aggregate adequate numbers for statistical analysis, we reviewed data from the period April 2014 through August '17.  In the farsighted series of 57 eyes, for which follow-up date is available on 54 (94.7%), 72.2% of eyes achieved 20/20 vision.   Eyes in the current study that did not achieve 20/20 uncorrected acuity may be awaiting enhancement care, or these patients may be very comfortable with their current level of vision.  Loss of 1 or even 2 lines of best-corrected visual acuity is, though, a recognized consequence of farsighted laser treatment.
  • In the farsightedness treatment group, patients with less than 6 weeks of follow-up data were excluded.

Take a look at our great reviews and then schedule your consultation